What's your #AprilFoolome?

In honor of April Fool's Day, we are holding a Twitter contest to find the best and funniest new '-ome' .

Go to the profile of Michael Chao
Mar 27, 2017
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What's your #AprilFoolome?


The goal

For Aprils Fools Day, we are announcing a Nature Microbiology Twitter contest to come up with the best and funniest new -ome. With the explosion of '-ome' all over the place (e.g., microbiome, resistome), we are asking for humorous suggestions for the up and coming new '-omes' that we're all certain to be exploring in the coming years.


Rules:

1. From today until the end of Thursday March 30, we are asking for '-ome' suggestions on Twitter. Entries should include the suggestion of your new '-ome' with a short definition (within Twitter character limits, please) tagged with the hashtag #AprilFoolome.

2. From the entries, the Nature Microbiology editorial team will pick our 4 favorite entries on March 31 and put them up as a Twitter poll. The Twitter Hivemind can then vote for their favorite through the April Fool's weekend (poll closing end of Sunday).

3. On April 3, we will announce the entry with the most votes on Twitter and then send the winner a 'swag' pack of microbiology-related & Nature Microbiology gifts.


S-ome examples:

Here are a few examples provided by us editors to get the ball rolling:

Gardenome: bacteria commonly found on small ornamental statues that fish in ponds in the back yard built environment

Motorome: collected genes of bacteria that produce flagella and never settle in one place to live

Resist-ohm: bacteria that are electrogenic but are also able to survive treatment with antibiotics

ET-phoneome: microorganisms found in mobile devices used by cute aliens with glowing fingers

Swag:

For your creativity, the winner shall be provided with the following prizes:

1) a one year personal subscription to Nature Microbiology

2) two Giant Microbes

3) Nature Microbiology paraphernalia (that are also useful for grant writing): a pen, a stress ball and a pill case (Note: analgesics not included).



HAPPY TWEETING!

Go to the profile of Michael Chao

Michael Chao

Associate Editor, Nature Microbiology

I first developed an interest in bacterial pathogenesis while at Cornell University. I then earned my PhD in Biomedical and Biological Sciences from Harvard University in Eric Rubin’s laboratory, studying cell wall remodelling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. From 2012-2015, I continued my training as a postdoctoral fellow in Matthew Waldor’s lab at Harvard Medical School, investigating the role of DNA methylation on regulating fundamental cellular processes in Vibrio cholerae.

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