There must a better way to model clinical biofilms - Interview with Thomas Bjarnsholt

In new researcher published today in npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, a team of researchers led by Thomas Bjarnsholt from the University of Copenhagen describe a new way of modelling chronic would biofilms.

Go to the profile of Ben Libberton
Feb 19, 2018
3
0

New research published today in NPJ Biofilms and Microbiomes from Thomas Bjarnsholt in Copenhagen.

Tools for studying growth patterns and chemical dynamics of aggregated Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposed to different electron acceptors in an alginate bead model

Abstract

In chronic infections, bacterial pathogens typically grow as small dense cell aggregates embedded in a matrix consisting of, e.g., wound bed sludge or lung mucus. Such biofilm growth mode exhibits extreme tolerance towards antibiotics and the immune defence system. The bacterial aggregates are exposed to physiological heterogeneity and O2 limitation due to steep chemical gradients through the matrix, which is are hypothesised to contribute to antibiotic tolerance. Using a novel combination of microsensor and bioimaging analysis, we investigated growth patterns and chemical dynamics of the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an alginate bead model, which mimics growth in chronic infections better than traditional biofilm experiments in flow chambers. Growth patterns were strongly affected by electron acceptor availability and the presence of chemical gradients, where the combined presence of O2 and nitrate yielded highest bacterial growth by combined aerobic respiration and denitrification.


Reference

Tools for studying growth patterns and chemical dynamics of aggregated Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposed to different electron acceptors in an alginate bead model

Majken Sønderholm, Klaus Koren, Daniel Wangpraseurt, Peter Østrup Jensen, Mette Kolpen, Kasper Nørskov Kragh, Thomas Bjarnsholt & Michael Kühl

npj Biofilms and Microbiomes volume 4, Article number: 3 (2018), doi:10.1038/s41522-018-0047-4


Go to the profile of Ben Libberton

Ben Libberton

Communications Officer, MAX IV Laboratory

I'm a Communications Officer at MAX IV Laboratory in Lund, Sweden, formally a Postdoc in the biofilm field. I'm interested in how bacteria cause disease and look to technology to produce novel tools to study and ultimately prevent infection. Part of my current role is to find ways to use synchrotron radiation to study microorganisms.

No comments yet.